Free 12 Week Half Marathon Training Plan …. 

The half marathon is the most popular race in America.  Running 13.1 miles is not easy, but as long as you put in the training, it’s a relatively “friendly distance.” Beginners who have completed a 5K or 10K, think of the half marathon as the next step up. Many experienced runners like half marathons, because they are easier to train for and race 13.1 miles compared to a full marathon.  The purpose of this article is to provide a 12 week half marathon training plan that you can follow. If your ultimate goal is 26.2 miles, a 13.1 mile race offers a good starting point.  However, if completing a half marathon is your goal, I can assure you that crossing the finish line will give you a feeling of great accomplishment.

When you buy something using the retail links in our stories, we may earn a small commission. Middleagemarathoner does not accept money for editorial gear reviews.

KEY POINTS

  • The goal of the following 12 week half marathon plan is to get you to the starting line fresh, fit and ready to race your best.
  • This plan is meant for beginners who have never run a half marathon. If you are an experienced runner and seeking to improve your time off your last race, consider training with me or hiring me to develop an affordable custom training plan.
  • You should consult a qualified and licensed medical professional prior to beginning or modifying any exercise program.
  • During the course of using this plan, you need to be willing to adjust and adapt to your individual circumstances. These include your goals, abilities, school, family life, illness, work, injury, etc.
  • This half marathon training plan is intended to be for general informational use. It is not intended to constitute any fitness and/or medical advice.
  • It is strongly suggested that you use personal judgment when participating in any training or exercise program.

I have prepared many beginner half-marathoners.  My step by step interactive plan increases the weekly mileage and is designed to challenge middle age athletes while also minimizing the risk of training too hard. The plan allows athletes to build endurance and ultimately taper properly.  Before starting to train for a half marathon, you need to possess a basic fitness level. But assuming no major problems, most healthy people can train themselves to complete a 13.1-mile race.  This half marathon training plan assumes you have the ability to run 3 – 4 miles without stopping, three to four times a week and have been doing so for the last 6 months. Basically, you need a fitness & mileage base before you start training for a half marathon. If that seems difficult, consider a shorter distance for your first race.

PACE CHART

Use the paces below when determining your pace for the various workouts within the training plan:

 

Goal Time1:452:002:152:302:45
Easy/Long Run Pace9:18/mile10:3211:3013:0014:12
Tempo Pace7:478:529:5711:0012:02
Long Interval Pace7:098:129:1710:1511:15
Short Interval Pace6:337:328:319:2510:20

Pace:

This plan includes some specific pacing for the workouts.  Use the above pacing charts for guidance, but feel free to adjust.  When I write out plans for athletes whom I coach, I like to include a range for the paces.  This helps the athlete so they don’t get too worried if they’re slightly off.

Since this free plan is designed for beginners, I recommend that runs designated as “easy” be completed at a comfortable / conversational pace. If you can’t do that, then you’re probably running too fast. (If you run using a heart rate monitors, your target zone should be between 65 and 75 percent of your maximum pulse rate.)

Distance:

The training schedule dictates workouts at distances, from 3 to 11 miles. Don’t worry about running precisely those distances, just try to come close.  If you’re longest run prior to the race is only 8 miles, you’ll likely struggle to finish the entire 13.1 miles.  Simply do your best to pick courses through the neighborhood or in some scenic bike paths or nature trails. In deciding where to train, talk to other runners. If you’re not certain of distances, there’s many GPS watches make measuring courses easy.

Long Runs:

The key to success with the half marathon is the long run.  Fortunately, you don’t have to complete any 20 milers.  However the 10 – 11 mile runs will help to build your endurance and get you closer to your goal of completing the half marathon. Pacing for these runs is supposed to be easy/conversational.  What’s most important on these runs is to listen to your body while completing them and back off if you feel like you are having any pain. As you can see in the plan, I will have you progressively increasing your long runs each weekend. So, over the 12 weeks, your longest run will increase from 3 to 11 miles. During the last 2 weeks prior to the race, you’ll taper (less mileage, similar intensity) and then you’ll race the full 13.1 miles. Even though the schedule below suggests doing your long runs on Saturdays, you can do easily complete them Sundays.


If you’re interested in joining me, I can put together either a custom training plan or I can personally coach you. Either program will be specific to your goals and athletic abilities. Just click on the links for details. 


Rest Recovery:

Rest is essential to your success.  In fact, remember this formula, stress+rest=success.    There’s a few harder/longer runs included in this plan.  You need to rest and go slow in between these harder runs to avoid injury and get the most benefit out of the harder workouts.  Also remember, to keep your hard days hard and easy days easy.  Even if you feel really good on a planned easy day, this doesn’t mean pick up the pace or go run some hills.

Speed Work:

These are workouts where you run at a faster pace. For beginners, you complete a few of these workouts.  Benefits of speed work include: physiological & physical. You are training your body to push past its comfort zone.  As you feel the burn and learn to push past it, you train your body to deal with fatigue.  For each of the speed workouts, you should start with 10 – 15 minutes warm-up at Easy pace + some strides.  Following speed workouts with 10 – 15 minutes of cool down/recovery jog.  Use the pace chart above or either of the calculators to determine proper pace.

Types of speed work:

Tempo Runs:

Runs where you warm up for 10 minutes with a slow jog, and then run at a faster pace than your normal. This pace should be something you can maintain for 20 minutes, and is meant to be somewhat uncomfortable. You then cool down for 10 or 15 minutes with a slow jog. Click on this link for more details about How Tempo Runs Will Help You Achieve Your Running Goals

Intervals:

These are a specific duration of time at higher effort, followed by an equal or slightly longer duration of recovery. After a warm up at an easy pace, you run hard for 2 minutes, then walk or jog slowly for 2-3 minutes to allow recovery. Then you repeat. Just like the above workouts, you end with a cool down.

Fartleks:

Swedish for “speed play.” These are less structured than interval workouts. The distance and duration of the higher intensity running varies, as well as the rest between. For example, you would decide, “I am going to run a pick-up at a quicker (not sprinting) pace I could maintain for an entire 5k all the way to that tree (or for 45 seconds). Then, after starting you reach the tree, you jog slowly until you’ve recovered and then you run another pick-up. Keep repeating as designated in the plant. As with the other speed workouts, you start and finish with a slower jog to warm up and cool down.

Hills:

A great way to build strength, endurance, improve running form and increase speed. There’s 2 x hill workouts included in this plan. If you can’t find a hill in your area, try stairs at a local high school football stadium. Click on this link for more details about hill training for full and half marathons.

Cross-Train:

I schedule cross training 1-2 times per week in this plan. This means you’re doing something other than running. Aerobic exercises work best. It could be swimming, cycling, hiking, cross-country skiing. The reason we cross train is to stress the body in a different way. This helps build muscle as well as give our body a break from the stress of running. Cross-training days should be considered easy days that allow you to recover from the running you do the rest of the week. I like cross training because it helps to reduce the risk of injury.

Conditioning:

This can also be referred to as strength training. It includes workouts that strengthen the legs, glutes, core, shoulders, hips and other muscles/joints used when running. There’s a few links to YouTube videos where I will show specific conditioning routines that I recommend. Most of the exercises are simple bodyweight exercises. A few use a BOSU Ball or resistance bands just for variety. Strength Training Workouts For Runners.

Glute & Hip Strengthening Exercises:

This video shows some exercises that are completed with a Resistance Bands. Bands may be available at your gym or you can purchase a variety of resistances in a pack through retailers like Resistance Bands.  If you don’t have access to a resistance bands, you can complete the exercises below (see photos and descriptions).

Racing:

These are a specific duration of time at higher effort, followed by an equal or slightly longer duration of recovery. After a warm up at an easy pace, you run hard for 2 minutes, then walk or jog slowly for 2-3 minutes to allow recovery. Then you repeat. Just like the above workouts, you end with a cool down.

Making Changes To The Schedule:

Don’t be afraid to adjust the workouts from day to day and week to week. The key is to be consistent with your training plant.

Strides:

Strides are a great way to practice good form & improve your speed by turning over your legs at a quick, but controlled pace.  Watch the video to see how strides should be performed. 

Stretching & Warm-Up:

Before all runs – complete Lunges & Leg Swings (click for video).

Dynamic or Rope stretching (click for video).  It’s important to complete rope stretching at least 3-4 times per week.

Foam Rolling:

Foam rolling should be completed at least 3-4 times per week.  Click for video

Nutrition & Sleep:

Both of these are essential to your success, yet in many cases they are overlooked by many athletes.  Lack of sleep can lead to a few negative side effects.  These include reducing your body’s ability to efficiently store carbs, convert fat to fuel and recover properly.

Remember Hard exercise + low carb diet = fatigue.  Fueling prior to and during exercise improves endurance performance.

12 Week Half Marathon Training Plan:

12 week half marathon training plan

CLICK TO SEE MORE ARTICLES ON MARATHON TRAINING

CLICK TO FIND MORE INJURY PREVENTION STRATEGIES

CLICK HERE FOR TIPS TO STAY MOTIVATED